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tv   Anderson Cooper 360  CNN  February 26, 2010 10:00pm-12:00am EST

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>> larry: if i would have said to you, pam, ten years ago you're going to be married to a convict. >> i would have told you you were crazy. >> larry: james, you were going to marry someone involved in the manson murders. >> i wouldn't have bought that. no. >> larry: we all should watch this. "ac 360" starts right now. -- captions by vitac -- www.vitac.com good evening, i'm sanjay gupta if for anderson cooper tonight. up close, exclusive new details about what happened after the killer whale grabbed the trainer. did the trainer make a fatal mistake? what should happen to the whale? we'll ask those questions to animal expert jack hanna. also tonight, a truly endangered species. the american family doctor. why fewer doctors are going into general practice, why health care reform may help and why as i found today it may also make the problem worse. our "broken government" report. later, saving haiti. a mother's love for her son. you'll see what she went through to find him.
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he was always just out of reach until the reunion. first up, though, broken government. family doctors and your health. now, full disclosure. i'm not a family doctor. i'm a specialist. a neurosurgeon. i love my work and it turns out that i'm not alone. ask a medical school graduate and she'll tell you, she's going into a specialty. neurosurgery, radiology, dermatology, anything it seems but general practice. that's the problem. tonight we'll look at the reasons why and what health care reform promises to do about it. it's complicated. i think you'll agree, it's not brain surgery. they are part of american lore. the country family doctor. primary physician. making house calls, fixing whatever's broken. that version of the primary care doctor has long since faded away. the thing is the modern-day version may also be close behind which makes the woman you're about to meet an even more rare breed. hi. >> hi. dr. gupta.
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nice to meet you. >> part of the reason i wanted to come meet you was because you're going into primary care. >> yes. >> there's fewer and fewer of you. why aren't more of your colleagues choosing this as a profession? >> i think there's several reasons. one of the main reasons is the prestige, the spotlight is just not on family medicine physicians. we don't have the same reputation like some of the other doctors do in the subspecialties. >> over the next decade the american academy of family physicians predicts a 40,000 primary care doctor shortage. that's before any reform of the health care system that could introduce tens of millions of new patients into that system. which is going to make finding doctors to fill rooms like this even harder. it's been 17 years since i finished medical school. over that time the number of medical students choosing primary care has slipped by more than 50%. if you want more of a scale of reference, at the nation's largest medical school, university of illinois, they graduated 314 medical students
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last year. only 20 chose primary care. >> people who have insurance can't find a doctor so suddenly we're going to give insurance or give access to health care to a whole bunch of people who haven't had it without increasing the number of physicians. it's going to be a problem. >> reporter: so why such a dramatic decrease? how much of this is about money? just compensation? >> i think that's a major reason why a lot of medical students aren't choosing family medicine. the potential for financial gain is just not the same as those other fields. >> do you have any idea, what is the average salary of a primary care physician in this country? >> here in atlanta it differs. depending on what area of the country you're in. here in atlanta maybe around $150,000, you're starting off. >> reporter: that's slightly lower than the national average of $173,000 a year. specialists do make more. cardiologists, they average $419,000. oncologists average $335,000.
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residents are hopeful they'll stay afloat. according to a physician's foundation survey which questioned almost 12,000 doctors, found half of them are look to cut their patient load and/or close their clinics because of low reimbursement from insurance companies and the cost of malpractice insurance skyrocketing. all the reasons you stated as to why people don't go into primary care, you still did. >> yes. >> why's that? >> as a medical student i realized i had a very strong interest in pediatrics and o.b. i couldn't decide. family medicine was the perfect fit for me. >> she also told me she loves being a primary care doctor. question, of course, how to get for doctors like her. on the current bill there are incent efs for primary care physicians including loan programs and reimbursement rates for primary care physicians as well. in a new study, doctors cutting
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work hours, creating even greater shortages. some are citing lower paper services. other saying the growing hassing of dealing with insurance company bureaucrats. we're joined by boy watkins at syracuse university and primary care doctor, vance harris. thanks for joining us. >> thank you for having me. >> you bet. >> dr. harris, you know, you made a remarkable comment. you said given the current situation being a primary care physician is the least rewarding career you could possibly imagine. quite a blunt comment. what got you to this point? >> you know, it is a comment that's just, i think it's alarming when you hear that from someone who has been really excited about being a primary care doctor for the last 20 years. insurance companies, drug companies, government regulations, decreasing reimbursements has had us on thin ice for probably a decade. this weekend the ice broke through. this is the weekend where i think things come crashing in. the latest survey showed 26% of
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doctors have either close the office or plan on closing their offices in the next few months. i think we'll see tens of thousands of doctors leave medicine. >> you're talking about primary care physician or talking about all doctors here? >> i think we're talking primarily primary care. i think it's hitting people in all different aspects of medicine. when they can't pay their overhead, they're leaving. >> who are the primary culprits in this? who's causing this? >> i think the important question to ask for the american people is where's the money? it's not as if the health care industry is short of cash. we spend more money on health care in the united states than the entire gdp of india which has a billion people, by the way. the pharmaceutical industry is the third most profitable industry in america. the insurance industry is number nine on the list. humana made $25 billion in 2008. there's plenty of money going around. i think what's missing is you don't have across the board
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accountability when it comes to what we need to do to provide incentives for primary care physicians. we know how important they are. we know they're the first line of defense and know they need resources. everyone sort of has their stake in a highly dysfunctional health care system and nobody wants to pay that cost. >> a system that people are talking about undergoing some sort of reform now, dr. harris. is the reform that you're hearing about going to be enough to remedy some of the things you're talking about? >> no, i think that's a good question. the sense we have a sickness care system. i don't think we have a health care system. our entire system is focused on sickness and illness, not on health. if you look what we can do with the funds we have. if we were to put those resources into helping people become healthy and reduce amount of illness and sickness it would go a long way toward solving the problem. a study a week ago showed a 40% reduction in cancer rates if we eat a little less, exercise more, quit smoking and drink a little less.
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we spend a lot of money each year on cancer. no one is championing the cause of health reform in the sense of health care. all we really have are whole industries based on sickness care. unfortunately that's what we have. >> it's very much like we're in fireman mode all the time putting out these fires. professor watkins, when you look at everything that's going on, can the administration right now address this shortage of primary care physicians? 40,000 potentially short within the next few years. i've heard over 100,000 short in a couple of decades. >> what has to happen is there has to be a courageous commitment to reallocating resources within that industry. we know that the money's there. everyone wants to pretend they don't have it. if you go into a house where there's plenty of food and overweight people in the house and one of the kids is starving to death you look at the overweight kids and says, who's eating all the food? in this industry we know the money's there. i don't think the government has the resources to fill that gap. we have to realize that by the
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year 2030 20% of the american population will be over the age of 65. that means we're going to have an increased demand for these primary care physicians and the inability to provide that care. our gdp is going to drop. national productivity drops when the number of young people drop. if we don't find a way to fix this problem we're going to be in serious trouble. >> they taub about loan foriveness programs, increasing reimbursements. maybe some of those things will work. obviously a lot more to discuss in the future. boys watkins, dr. harris. there's a lot more at ac 360.com. you'll find a state by state map that shows where the shortages of primary care doctors are the worst. the live chat is up and running at ac360.com. send questions and comments on twitter to me at sanjay gupta cnn. up next, though, the woman who was supposed to keep these two out of the white house is leaving the white house,
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herself. was the crasher scandal to blame? might it have been something else? later, does something happen on this amateur video that provides any clues as to why a seaworld trainer died? could she have made a fatally wrong move? what's going to happen to that killer whale as well? ut pressur. and congestion. introducing sudafed pe® triple action™. for more complete relief from the sinus triple threat. sudafed pe® triple action™. more complete relief. it was rea@dy nice to meet you, a.j.
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tonight a high-profile white house staffer is stepping down. social secretary desiree rogers is going to resign next month. that announcement comes three months after an uninvited couple, salahis, crashed a white house state dinner. at the time some accused the
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white house of protecting rogers from testifyi ining about the breach, allowing the secret service to take the heat. ed henry joins us now with the raw politics. i was at that state dinner. i saw the salahis. i didn't know they were not invited at the time. it was a huge embarrassment, obviously for the white house. you've been there. how much of a contributing factor do you think what we're looking at now was in rogers stepping down? >> you know, sanjay, it's interesting. today robert gibbs, the spokesman in one time talking about desiree rogers said she opened the gates to the white house to a lot of people who had not been there before. in fairness, he was referred to the fact she lot a lot of poor, underprivileged people into the white house for social occasions beyond the salahi incident. by using that language about opening up the gates it comes to mind the fact the salahis got into the state dinner. huge embarrassment. everybody around the whouite hoe
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was saying it wasn't a factor. we were told when the story broke, the president, himself, was personally upset by that, called desiree rogers in and made clear he was unhappy. he's sort of more like the disappointed parent. he doesn't dress you down. he sort of closes his eyes, makes a face in a meeting that makes clear to you he's not happy. he doesn't usually dress people down. that shows it was a huge embarrassment. in fairness there were other factors as well. >> let's talk about those others factors. it seems like desiree rogers had a higher profile than other secretaries of the past. how was that taken among her colleagues? >> absolutely. there are democrats close to the white house for months. even before the salahi incident. that were telling me and others that they felt like it was an embarrassment to the white house that almost every time they picked up, you know, the gossip pages in new york they'd see desiree rogers at some fashion show, pick up a glossy magazine, see here in a photo shoot and felt she was losing sight of the
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fact she was not the principal, that she was representing the president and first lady, that maybe she shouldn't have been so outfront. desiree rogers spoke to my colleague, suzanne malveaux and the speculation she fell out of favor by valerie jarrett because of these incidents was nonsense. she feels she set up the white house social secretary office, put on hundreds of events. it's a very tough job in terms of the volume of people coming through. you're not going to do it perfectly every time. she feels she did the job well and is moving on now. >> ed henry, interesting obviously. we're going to dig deep ur now, laura schwartz, former assistant to president clint. en. >> hey, sanjay. >> cryou were in a role like th. i wanted to have you on the show to talk about some of your first
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impressions. do you think her resignation was something that surprised you? >> i was expecting it any time now. it's been 14 months since they came into office. there's been a little while since november when the state dinner was. i really think -- i mean, this is just me talking here -- i really think here after the event happened she then got relegated to the gates wearing her i.d. badge, checking people in. like she should, but, again, back to what ed was saying about those glossy magazines and fashion week in new york and things. i don't think that was the job anymore she really wanted it to be. >> i mean, at the end of the day do you think that she was asked to leave, essentially? was she asked to leave? do you really think it was because her job became more menial than she would have liked? >> she came into that job as one of the best friends of the obamas. think it's really difficult to separate friendship, like you would hear her on "entertainment tonight" and "extra" referring to michelle would like this and barack would like that. they are the president and first
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lady. i don't think she really had that separation between friend and staffer. i think it was a really big hit for her personally. i have to tell you, sanjay, if they had handled this better i don't think it would be a fireable offense to say, we screwed up, this is never going to happen again, we've re-evaluated the issues in the social office and we're moving forward. instead when this happened they sort of threw the secret service under the bus for a while. that makes it a lot harder to recover from. >> were you surprised, ed henry talked about the fact president obama, himself, essentially gave a dressing down to desiree rogers. were you surprised by that? did something like that happen to you when you worked for the clintons? >> no, luckily not. when you think about it, here we had the first state dinner of this administration. india. the world backdrop between india and the united states. there were a lot great issues that day. what were we talking about?
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gate crashers. how happy do you think the country of india was with that? it deserved a dressing down and should never happen again. >> it's a very disciplined white house. president obama likes to speak of teachable moments, as you know. was there one here? >> i think there was. own up to the mistake and move forward. the claiming of executive privilege, the reason she can't go and testify or answer questions is not the moment to use the executive privilege card. i think they learned a lot from this as she did and we'll see what's next. >> all right. laura schwartz, thanks so much. stay warm in chicago, by the way. >> oh, it's great. >> all right. up next, it is snowing, have you heard? easy for me to say from the balmy south here. it is bad. we know that. we'll show you how bad, where and why it isn't over yet. later, what happened to just moments after seaworld visitor captured this video? did the killer whale's trainer make a fatal mistake? what should happen to that whale? jack hanna is going to join us.
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coming up, new details in the killer whale attack that left a seaworld trainer dead. is it possible the victim made a fatal mistake that led to the attack? other important stories we're following. brianna keeler joins us.
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snow it continues to pound the northeast tonight. in the third major storm of the month. it's dumped more than 2 feet of snow in some areas. forcing the cancelation of roughly a thousand flights in new york airports alone. also in new york, governor david paterson today announced he will not run for a full term in office. the governor dropped his campaign after reports that state police interfered in a top aide's domestic violence dispute. paterson asked new york attorney general andrew cuomo to investigate. he spoke to the press today denying any wrongdoing. >> i have never abused my office, not now, not ever. and i believe that when the facts are reviewed the truth will prevail. word today that president obama called former vice president dick cheney to wish him a speedy recovery. the white house said the president called mr. cheney
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wednesday after his release from the hospital. the former vp suffered a mild heart attack monday, fifth in 32 years. a hong kong jeweler smashed world records paying a whopping $35.3 million for a rough diamond. at 507 karats the diamond is one of the high-quality gems in the world, sanjay. >> i wonder if my wife's watching right now. >> hopefully not. >> you just got married. maybe your husband's watching. >> right. i'm going to go home and, hello, hello. >> we have nothing to say about that. stick with us here. i have our beat 360 winners. daily challenge to viewers. a chance to show up staffers by coming up a better caption for the photo we post every day. tonight's photo, three men walk their dogs in central park in the middle of today's snowstorm. lucky dogs. our staff winner is tracy, her capti caption, watch out where the doggies go and don't you eat
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that yellow snow. not bad. not bad. our viewer winner is kevin from atlanta. his caption is, woof blizzard here, reporting live. snow slowly turning yellow one puddle at a time. >> that's very clever. i really like that one. i have to say i think kevin's wins out overall. very cute. i'm sure wolf will be pleased. >> let's send him a t-shirt for sure. serious stuff when we come back. jack hanna joins us to talk about what this killer whale did to a trainer and what the trainer might have done that sealed her fate. later, a mother who simply would not give up until she found her son. we were there for that reunion. ooh.
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then recommends the custom fit orthotic that's best fo@)your feet. for customized comfort all day long. for locations, see drscholls.com. new developments today out of seaworld in orlando where a 12,000 pound killer whale named tilikum fatally attacked a trainer. officials there said shows featuring the whales are going to resume tomorrow. the head of seaworld calls tilikum a wonderful animal that won't be punished. one former trainer speaking out saying the victim made a deadly error in judgment. up close tonight, here's randi kaye. >> reporter: you're looking at video of seaworld trainer dawn brandcheau. a tourist taped this. it was just moments before the 12,000 pound killer whale, called tilikum, took the veteran trainer into his mouth and dove under water. brandcheau sways from side to side. he follows. she splashes him with buckets of
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water and feeds him fish. a reward for playing along. then suddenly his behavior seemed to change. the wife of the tourist who took this video described what happened on nbc. >> he grabbed her by the head and, you know, very hard thrusts. she went down. i screamed and she screamed. i started yelling to the other trainer because he wasn't looking. i said, he took her down. >> reporter: earlier reports suggested the whale had grabbed brandcheau's waist. today seaworld set the record straight. >> our best analysis at this point is he grabbed her ponytail. >> reporter: look closely at this video. see brandcheau's long ponytail swinging back and forth. it may not have looked attractive to this six-ton killer whale until she got closer. the man who trained her said she made a fatal mistake. >> i think she made a mistake by putting her, and allowing herself, to be that close to his mouth and laying down. that's a pretty vulnerable
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position to be in with an animal like him. so i think -- i think even if dawn was sitting here with me right now, she would tell you that was a mistake she made. >> reporter: remember, tilikum had killed before. in 1991 he and other two other whales pulled a trainer who fell into the pool underwater in a park in british columbia. that's why seaworld was more cautious with him. trainers were not allowed to swim with tilikum. >> he's not used to people being in the water. he was laying there looking at her. she was rubbing him down. all of a sudden the ponytail was there. >> reporter: on this video you can see what he's talking about. brandcheau is on a shelf that slides out into the pool. laying in about four inches of water. right next to the 22-foot-long orca. >> the ponytail drifted there. he probably grabbed it and pulled her in and went, whoa, i have her in the water. >> reporter: he has worked with
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whales for more than three decades, says he's convinced at least in the beginning tilikum had no idea he was doing anything wrong or hurting his trainer. he says brandcheau understandably panicked and that trauma only got the killer whale even more excited. the medical examiner says dawn brandcheau likely died from multiple traumatic injuries and drowning. >> i constantly remind trainers never get comfortable, totally comfortable with the animals. >> reporter: he says there's a reason these whales are called killer whales. and what they may think is a game can be fatal. randi kaye, cnn, washington. seaworld's decision to basically defend tilikum is drawing plenty of fire then there is the bigger picture. debate over whether enormous predators should be kept in tanks in the first place. with me now, jack hanna, director of the columbus zoo who supports keeping whales in captivity. has a long-standing relationship with seaworld, on its conservation board as well.
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russ rector, founder of dolphin freedom foundation. he believes whales belong in the ocean. let's get to it. jack, details coming in now are terrifying. source at seaworld telling us tilikum dove deep under water after seizing the ponytail and took staffers 40 minutes to retrieve her body. what does that mean to you? >> if you look at the first interview i did two hours after the incident on wednesday, you'll see i said in not knowing the details that maybe human error was involved. not knowing anything, just 42 years of working with animals. this wasn't an attack by any means. the whale saw the hair, something different, took the hair and took dawn, who was a very good friend -- i'm still not over that -- down and obviously what happened happened. as far as the whales at seaworld, they're socially, mentally, physically beautifully cared for. they wouldn't be breeding or they wouldn't be eating and sure wouldn't be living there.
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obviously i support it for many, many reasons. it's not just education. it's the fact that 80% plus killer whales at seaworld are born at seaworld. this speaks very highly of their breeding programs. >> russ, i want you to look at some of the video i think we have as well. you used to train dolphins. or kas are a fine of dolphin. many of us have seen video of the orcas in the wild throwing and playing with their prey. you can see the video right there i think, russ. is this what you think was happening here? or to you think something else? do you think he just snapped? >> no, this was an attack. this animal killed twice before. he knows how to kill. he attack, he killed her. he took her down to the windows underwater and showed her body to the people below eating dinner. it took 40 minutes to get her away from him. had to take him to the med pillow, lift him out of the water and pry her out of his mouth. because she was a trophy. that's why. that was an attack. happy animals -- happy animals
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don't kill trainers. >> it is hard to talk about what has happened here in that context certainly. jack, what about what russ is saying? can all animals be put into captivity? tilikum had been involved at least in three killings before. was he possibly not right, tilikum -- >> well, again, i don't know what russ -- i know what russ' background is, by the way. have you ever seen a killer whale attack, sanjay? while we've been in the wild, when a killer whale attacks, especially go up on the land 10 or 15 feet to get a big old 400 pound sea lion it's like a bomb going off. that's an attack. if this was an attack he wouldn't be grabbing her hair, taking her down. i don't get into detail like he wants to get into detail. the woman who's a friend is gone, all right? that's not an attack whatsoever by a killer whale. he should know that. if he knows a lot about whales. that wasn't an attack whatever.
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>> russ, i think it's appropriate to not get into some of these details, but g ahead, what were you going to say to jack? >> i was going to say, first of all there are no documented attacks on people by orcas in the wild. only in captivity. yes, i've seen them attack how they hunt. blaming dawn for this, jam, is like blaming a rape victim for being raped. >> did i say i blamed dawn? >> one -- seaworld hasn't come out yet with a statement. i said from the very start if you worked with animals -- if you worked with animals for 42 years like i have, i'm just saying that a lot of accidents happen in our business, including with me, my good friend steve irwin, a lot of time it's human error. i don't know what the protocol is at seaworld. all i know is what i saw. >> let me put it to you this way. was there a mistake made in any way here? if so, what is to be learned? what is to be lrned? what is to be changed in the future? >> obviously what's learned,
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mistake is the long hair, if anything, i guess, what from i saw from the video i studies this afternoon. obviously seaworld will make those changes. after 2 million plus interactions with whales for years, this is the first incident and death they've had. much more good has come out of it. if dawn were alive today she'd want her work to continue and seaworld's work to continue. 22 million people at seaworld would say that and 180 million people that went to our zoos and aquariums would say that. >> there are a lot of people who never make it into the wild, never get a chance to see the animals there. this may be their only opportunity. she did have long hair for some time. it's tough to look at video in the moments before this happened. >> real quickly, she had that long hair. she was growing that hair, she going to cut several weeks for cancer. she was growing that hair for kids with cancer. can you imagine that? how her parents, i feel and other people feel is beyond comprehension. right now they're trying to let
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the family and us recover then we can tell everybody every detail of what happened. >> jack, let me ask you a question. >> okay, russ, real quick. we'll let jack take this. >> jack, how many kills does this animal get? he's killed three people. does he get four, five, six? >> you know something, russ, i can't argue that. i know what the incident was up north. second kill, as you know, the man, you've been in the business, jumped over the fence, went in there at nighttime, dove down because he wanted to be with the killer whale, obviously was tilly. it can't be seaworld's fault or the whale's fault. the first one i don't know about, russ. this one we all know about. with that said i can't see putting the whale back out in the wild. the animal would not even live two -- >> he is not going to go back to the wild. >> exactly right. >> he shouldn't go back to the wild. >> right. >> to be clear, seaworld has issued a statement saying the animal will not go back to the wild. will stay at seaworld. >> i know that. >> okay.
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just clarification for our audience, first two events, one as you mentioned and the second one, i think there were actually three whales involved. i'm not sure we're going to get absolute clarification or conclusion here. obviously lots to think about. jack hanna, russ rector, many thanks to you both. join the live chat happening at ac360.com. send your questions and comments as well to twitter at sanjay gupta cnn. the power of a mother's love. what it took to find her small son after the earthquake in haiti. plus an athlete, a really good athlete and a scholar. he has a shot of being at the top of the nfl draft after spending the last year at oxford university. he's an amazing guy. we have his amazing journey. fed. for more complete relief from the sinus triple threat. sudafed pe® triple action™. more complete relief.
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let's go to haiti tonight. to find an incredible story of hope, strength and determination, about a mother and her child. they were separated by the earthquake. in the weeks after mother searched for son. she never stopped looking, never gave up. this week the two are reunited and gary tuchman was there. >> reporter: she survived the earthquake, but she's been looking for her 2-year-old son for weeks. >> translator: he's a very kind boy. even if we don't have enough to eat we do it together. we stick together. >> reporter: eclane's home was
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destroyed. rubble has already been cleared. both her legs were injured. her son, kirvin's, though, was more seriously hurt. taken away by military helicopter for treatment. problem is no one took the toddler's name when they flew him away. kirvin's disappeared. more than a week, eclane hobbled on her crutches down the street of port-au-prince, took taxis desperately looking for her son, going to different hospitals and having no luck whatsoever until she got here. this is the entrance to the country's largest aids clinic. it so happens this is where her son was brought. and where he was for only a while. eclane met dr. vanessa here. though the doctor never knew the boy's name, she remembered him. >> i met him on the 23rd after he'd had his leg amputated because he has a severe leg injury that was infected. he hadn't had care for over a week. >> reporter: it broke the doctor's heart when she had to tell eclane her boy had been
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moved a week earlier. moved to to the u. zmt s.s. comfort. >> reporter: she flew to the u.s. ship looking for kirvin. once again he was gone. he had been transferred to a hospital in northern haiti, six hours away from his mom. at least they'd be together again, right? wrong. the red tape. the earthquake destroyed eclane's personal paper. had no legal proof kirvin's son. >> they want to do things the right way. how can we prove these people claiming to be parents are really parents? >> reporter: finally after almost three weeks in that hospital they were reunited. the international red cross and the government of haiti had concluded eclane and kirvin were, indeed, mother and son. this was the moment his mother had been dreaming about. it had been five weeks since she'd seen her 2-year-old. the international red cross says
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the delay was necessary. you don't think that it was wrong it took so long? >> on the contrary i think it was right all the procedures were followed and that now there is a happy ending. >> reporter: how do you feel right now having your son back? >> translator: i'm ecstatic. i'm so happy i don't know what to say. >> reporter: then it was time to go home. they returned to a tiny tent in the middle of one of the poorest slums in port-au-prince. the conditions for everyone here are anything but good. but at least kirvins is with his mom. >> she just took her face and rubbed it against the little boy's cheek. 2-year-old boy is so cute. tough to see him back in that tent, i'm sure, gary for you and a lot of people. what is his prognosis? >> reporter: the prognosis is very good. kirvins' in excellent care in the u.s.s. comfort. the tent where they're living is the size of a toy for a lot of children. toy tent. the sanitation is abysmal.
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their bathroom is a porta-potty. their shower is buckets over their head. that wonderful doctor, a pediatrician and pledges she will take good care of little kirvins. >> that's good to hear for sure. i've been down there and saw the same sort of things, gary, you did. you did stories like this, but keeping in mind there are probably others like them. are there other injured children seperated from their parents that you know of? >> reporter: the international committee of the red cross says they have dozens of children right now separated from their parents. children are too young to talk so they can't say who their parents are. they think a lot of those children may have parents alive somewhere in this country and trying to match them up. >> gary, be safe down there. there's much more on this story at ac360.com where our producer has written a compelling behind the scenes account of what you just witnessed. new chapter next in one of the most inspiring stories we've shown. he traded a bright nfl future for oxford university.
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this rogue scholar is ready to play, but as you see, he has much bigger also tiger's latest setback. which brand is dumping him now? when you want a bank that travels with you. with you when you're ready for the next move. [ male announcer ] now that wells fargo and wachovia have come together, what's in it for you? unprecedented strength, the stability of the leading community bank in the nation and with 12,000 atms and thousands of branches, we're with you in more ways and places than ever before. with you when you want the most from your bank. [ male announcer ] wells fargo. together we'll go far.
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the scouting combine is under way as football fans know, a chance for pro scouts to check out physical skills of top college football applicants before the nfl draft. one of this year's standouts is attempting something that's never been done before. myron hopes to be picked near the top of the nfl draft,
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despite skipping a year of football to study as a rogue scholar at oxford university. he plans eventually to become a surgeon. inspirational stories about people whose lives often go unnoticed. here's soledad o buyon. >> reporter: a gifted athlete, he was all but assured enormous fame and even bigger money. then something happened. you quit basically. >> i did. i did. i don't like says that word. >> reporter: from the moment he first touched a football myron rolle was a star. >> i was good at it. i had some success. >> reporter: in high school espn ranked myron the number one senior football player in the country. 83 colleges made him an offer. >> myron rolle! >> reporter: myron chose florida state university, a prime lau h
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launching pad for the pros. myron played safety. a future, a shoo-in first-round pick in the nfl draft last year. millions of dollars to follow. that's when he basically quit when he put it all at risk. why did you leave, why did you quit football? >> i left football because the rogue scholarship was too great to pass up. it was either now or never. >> reporter: he won a prestigious scholarship, the chance to earn a master's degree in medical anthropology at oxford university in england. myron moved to england and watched the nfl draft from the sidelines. >> it hurt. it really did. inside deep i said, i could be out there right now making millions of dollars. that could be my name being called. when i went to oxford, i said, this is the right choice. >> reporter: he's not done with his studies. he has more to do at oxford. now nearly a year later, with that certainty of his, myron
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rolle came back. >> how are you doing? >> welcome home. >> thank you. >> reporter: sports superagent lee steinberg represents myron. >> we have to expose him to the teams in a way that will make them fall in love with him. we want him as top of the first round draft pick. >> reporter: first round. the difference between first round and say, third, millions. myron rolle has big dreams for using those millions. after a few years in the pros he wants to go to med school to become a neurosurgeon. he has to get back to england to finish his degree. today he's in orlando. >> push now, push, push, push. >> reporter: renowned trainer, tom shaw, pushing him hard. >> pop it. you can't make mistakes in the first round draft choice. that's how general managers get fired. you have to make sure this kid is everything you expect him to be. >> reporter: make no mistake. here no one cares about oxford. this is business. high-stakes football. is this guy as good as he was a
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year ago? for all of his journey, myron's had family helping clear the way. >> i remember something when we were younger i told myron i was like, yeah, i always got your back. >> 88 pounds. >> reporter: his older brother, mckinley, followed him to florida state and then on to oxford. and now game on. myron played well in the senior bowl last month. the nfl draft is weeks away. it's pressure. >> sometimes it's overwhelming. sometime have to take a step back. >> reporter: lots of people have stopped you say, you are the future of black america. is that a compliment or is it terrifying? >> you know, it's a compliment, but it's definitely more pressure, like, hey, we're counting on you. >> reporter: so many people counting on him. >> you know what that stands for? rogue scholar. >> reporter: for "in america," soledad o'brien, cnn, orlando. >> very few athletes have the drive or grades or guts to do
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what myron rolle is doing. we've been highlighting achievements own contributions of leaders like myron rolle as black history month. reflect on past tri yumps, look to the future with men and women making their own history. i hope to welcome to the world of neurosurgery as well. bombshell thousanow in the woods' story. how the canadian women celebrated their hockey win. we'll give you a clue. bottoms up. and the price they're paying for it now. nce. this is help protect and care for your employees at no cost to your company insurance. with aflac, your employees pay only for the coverage they want or need. and, the cost to you - nothing at all. if all you know about us is... aflac! ...then you don't know quack. to find out why more businesses provide aflac, visit getquack.com
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just ahead a record amount of snow as now fallen in new york's central park. we sent "ac 360" crew to investigate. it's the "shot" tonight. let's get caught up on important stories. brianna keeler with the 360 news and business bulletin. sanjay, tiger woods loses another endorsement deal. he'll no longer be doing commercials like this one for pepsi co's gatorade. company cut ties with the golfer. third major sponsor to drop him. kidnapping victim jaycee dugard taken the first step toward filing a lawsuit against the state of california. you'll recall she was kidnapped as a child by convicted sex offender phillip garrido who
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held her prisoner 18 years. his parole agents failed to spot dugard living in his backyard. dugard filed a claim to preserve her right to sue. hockey canada apologized today for its women's hockey team's on-ice celebration of its gold medal. they partied with beer, champagne, even cigars. fans had left the arena. international olympic committee is looking into the incident, sanjay. >> the cigars, huh? quite a sight. i imagine the fans would have stuck around just to see that. >> well, apparently the problem is there was media there, right? always the problem. >> media always is the problem. ioc, we'll see what they have to say. stick around for tonight's "shot." an "ac 360" snow day if you will. more than 35 inche white stuff fell in new york in february, as you know. gave us an excuse to send the crew out to central park for their own special weather report. brianna, take a look at this.
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♪ >> it's pushing these arms of snow almost hurricane-like arms. >> hey, chad myers in atlanta. this is frank romano in new york. >> snow continues. it continues for laguardia. i love showing you this map. >> you have all of these great magic walls and monitors. >> i have to draw it for you. okay, here. so you can kind of see. >> i would understand if this was august, but it's winter in new york. we got snow. >> somebody want to give me a hand here? ♪ >> just salting here. salting. please be careful. everyone, please be careful. ♪
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>> well, that's the end of our "360" weather report. we have some unfinished business. let's get to it. good night. >> very nice, guys. very nice. i think that was the most fun they've had in a while. >> i think so. got to love a snow day in news. they're few and far between. >> schools were actually off today i heard. just a few times over the last six years. four times over the last six years or something? >> we got nothing in d.c. we've had our share for sure. >> we're in the balmy south as well. brianna, great to work with you. >> as well with you. coming up at the top of the hour, why you might be having trouble finding a family doctor. stay with us. anncvo: with the new geico glovebox app... anncr vo: ...you can get help with a flat tire... anncr vo: ...find a nearby tow truck or gas station... anncr vo: ...call emergency services... anncr vo: ...collect accident information. anncr vo: or just watch some fun videos.
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good evening, i'm sanjay gupta in for anderson cooper tonight. up close, exclusive new details about what happened after the killer whale grabbed the trainer. also new questions including these. did the trainer make a fatal mistake?
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what should happen to the whale? we'll ask those questions to animal expert jack hanna. also tonight, a truly endangered species. the american family doctor. why fewer doctors are going into general practice, why health care reform may help and why as i found today it may also make the problem worse. our "broken government" report. later, saving haiti. a mother's love for her son. you'll see what she went through to find him. he was always just out of reach until the reunion. you'll also see tonight. first up though, "broken government." family doctors and your health. now, full disclosure. i'm not a family doctor. i'm a specialist. a neurosurgeon. i love my work and it turns out that i'm not alone. ask a medical school graduate and she'll tell you, she's going into a specialty. neurosurgery, radiology, dermatology, anything it seems but general practice. that's the problem. tonight we'll look at the reasons why and what health care reform promises to do about it. it's complicated. i think you'll agree, it's not brain surgery.
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they are part of american lore. the country family doctor. primary physician. making house calls, fixing whatever's broken. that version of the primary care doctor has long since faded away. the thing is the modern-day version may also be close behind which makes the woman you're about to meet an even more rare breed. hi. >> hi. dr. gupta. nice to meet you. >> part of the reason i wanted to come meet you was because you're going into primary care. >> yes. >> there's fewer and fewer of you. why aren't more of your colleagues choosing this as a profession? >> i think there's several reasons. one of the main reasons is the prestige, the spotlight is just not on family medicine physicians. we don't have the same reputation like some of the other doctors do in the subspecialties. >> reporter: over the next decade the american academy of family physicians predicts a
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40,000 primary care doctor shortage. that's before any reform of the health care system that could introduce tens of millions of new patients into that system. which is going to make finding doctors to fill rooms like this even harder. it's been 17 years since i finished medical school. over that time the number of medical students choosing primary care has slipped by more than 50%. if you want more of a scale of reference, at the nation's largest medical school, university of illinois, they graduated 314 medical students last year. only 20 chose primary care. >> people who have insurance can't find a doctor so suddenly we're going to give insurance or give access to health care to a whole bunch of people who haven't had it without increasing the number of physicians. it's going to be a problem. >> reporter: so why such a dramatic decrease? how much of this is about money? just compensation? >> i think that's a major reason why a lot of medical students aren't choosing family medicine. the potential for financial gain is just not the same as those other fields. >> do you have any idea, what is the average salary of a primary care physician in this country?
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>> here in atlanta it differs. depending on what area of the country you're in. here in atlanta maybe around $150,000, you're starting off. >> reporter: that's slightly lower than the national average of $173,000 a year. specialists do make more. cardiologists, they average $419,000. oncologists average $335,000. residents like nakato are hopeful they'll stay afloat. according to a physician's foundation survey which questioned almost 12,000 doctors, found half of them are looking to cut their patient load and/or close their clinics because of low reimbursement from insurance companies and the cost of malpractice insurance skyrocketing. all the reasons you stated as to why people don't go into primary care, you still did. >> yes. >> why's that? >> as a medical student i realized i had a very strong interest in pediatrics and o.b. and i just couldn't decide. family medicine was the perfect
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fit for me. because i knew that i could practice both. >> she also told me she loves being a primary care doctor. question, of course, how to get for doctors like her. on the current bill there are incentives for primary care physicians including loan forgiveness programs and also possible increased reimbursement rates for primary care physicians as well. there's also this. a new study shows doctors cutting their work hours creating even greater shortages. some are citing lower pay for services. others saying the growing hassle of dealing with insurance company bureaucrats. we're joined by bois watkins, professor at syracuse university and also primary care doctor, vance harris. thanks for joining us. >> thank you for having me. >> you bet. >> dr. harris, you know, you made a remarkable comment. you said given the current situation being a primary care physician is the least rewarding career you could possibly imagine. quite a blunt comment. what got you to this point?
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>> you know, it is a comment that's just, i think it's alarming when you hear that from someone who has been really excited about being a primary care doctor for the last 20 years. insurance companies, drug companies, government regulations, decreasing reimbursements has had us on thin ice for probably a decade. this weekend the ice broke through. this is the weekend where i think things come crashing in. the latest survey showed 26% of doctors have either close the office or plan on closing their offices in the next few months. i think we'll see tens of thousands of doctors leave medicine. >> you're talking about primary 4 care physicians or talking about all doctors here? >> i think we're talking primarily primary care. i think it's hitting people in all different aspects of medicine. when they can't pay their overhead, they're leaving. >> professor watkins, when you hear a comment like this, who are the primary culprits in this? who's causing this? >> i think the important question to ask for the american people is where's the money? it's not as if the health care
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industry is short of cash. we spend more money on health care in the united states than the entire gdp of india which has a billion people, by the way. the pharmaceutical industry is the third most profitable industry in america. the insurance industry is number nine on the list. humana made $25 billion in 2008. there's plenty of money going around. i think what's missing is you don't have across the board accountability when it comes to what we need to do to provide incentives for primary care physicians. we know how important they are. we know they're the first line of defense and know they need resources. everyone sort of has their stake in a highly dysfunctional health care system and nobody wants to pay that cost. >> a system that people are talking about undergoing some sort of reform now, dr. harris. is the reform that you're hearing about going to be enough to remedy some of the things you're talking about? >> no, i think that's a good question. the sense we have a sickness care system. i don't think we have a health care system. our entire system is focused on
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sickness and illness, not on health. if you look what we can do with the funds we have. if we were to put those resources into helping people become healthy and reduce amount of illness and sickness it would go a long way toward solving the problem. a study a week ago showed a 40% reduction in cancer rates if we eat a little less, exercise a little more, quit smoking and drink a little less. we spend a lot of money each year on cancer. the problem is no one's championing the cause of health reform in the sense of health care. all we really have are whole industries based on sickness care. unfortunately that's what we have. >> it's very much like we're in fireman mode all the time putting out these fires. professor watkins, when you look at everything that's going on, can the administration right now address this shortage of primary care physicians? you heard the numbers. 40,000 potentially short within the next few years. i've heard over 100,000 short in a couple of decades. >> yes. what has to happen is there
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has to be a courageous commitment to reallocating resources within that industry. we know that the money's there. everyone wants to pretend they don't have it. if you go into a house where there's plenty of food and there are overweight kids in the house and one of the kids is starving to death you pretty much look at the overweight kids and say, who's eating all the food? in this industry we know the money's there. i don't think the government has the resources to fill that gap. we have to realize that by the year 2030 20% of the american population will be over the age of 65. that means we're going to have an increased demand for these primary care physicians and the inability to provide that care. our gdp is going to drop. national productivity drops when the number of young people drop. at the end of the day if we don't find a way to fix this problem we're going to be in serious trouble. >> they talk about loan forgiveness programs, they talk about possibly increasing reimburseme reimbursements. a lot more to discuss in the future.
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bois watkins, dr. harris. there's a lot more at ac360.com. you'll find a state by state map that shows where the shortages of primary care doctors are the worst. let us know what you think about that. the live chat is up and running at ac360.com. send questions and comments on twitter to me at sanjay gupta cnn. up next, though, the woman who was supposed to keep these two out of the white house is now leaving the white house, herself. was the crasher scandal to blame? might it have been something else? details ahead. later, does something happen on this amateur video that provides any clues as to why a seaworld trainer died? could she have made a fatally wrong move? what's going to happen to that killer whale as well? that and more. advisor:... ms. davis, this is onstar. i've received a signal you've been in a crash... i'm contacting emergency services... 911 dispatch:...onstar reporting a front end crash... on wakefield road... chevy malibu... fire/ems:...air bags deployed... ...injuries reported...
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tonight a high-profile white house staffer is stepping down. social secretary desiree rogers is going to resign next month. that announcement comes three months after an uninvited couple, salahis, crashed a white house state dinner. at the time some accused the white house of protecting rogers from testifying about the security breach, allowing the secret service instead to take the heat. senior white house correspondent ed henry joins us now with the raw politics. i was at that state dinner. i saw the salahis. i didn't know they were not invited at the time. we know now it was a huge embarrassment, obviously, for the white house. you've been there. how much of a contributing factor do you think what we're looking at now was in rogers stepping down? >> you know, sanjay, it's interesting. today robert gibbs, the spokesman, in one point talking about desiree rogers said she
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opened the gates to the white house of a lot of people who had not been there before and did a double take. in fairness, he was referred to the fact she lot a lot of poor, underprivileged people into the white house for social occasions beyond the salahi incident. her friends say she should be applauded by that. by using that language about opening up the gates it comes to mind the fact the salahis got into the state dinner. huge embarrassment. everybody around the white house today was saying, no, no, it wasn't really a factor. in fact, we were told when that story broke the president, himself, was personally upset by that. called desiree rogers in and made clear he was unhappy. that's out of character for him. when you talk to the president's senior aides, they say he's more like the disappointed parent. he doesn't dress you down. he sort of closes his eyes, makes a face in a meeting that makes clear to you he's not happy. he doesn't usually dress people down. that shows this white house knew it was a huge embarrassment. in fairness there were other factors as well. >> let's talk about those others factors. it seems like desiree rogers had a higher profile than other social secretaries of the
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how was that taken among her colleagues? past. did that raise eyebrows? >> absolutely. there are democrats close to the white house for months. even before the salahi incident. that were telling me and others that they felt like it was an embarrassment to the white house that almost every time they picked up, you know, the gossip pages in new york they'd see desiree rogers at some fashion show, pick up a glossy magazine, see here in a photo shoot and felt she was losing sight of the fact she was not the principal, that she was representing the president and first lady, that she maybe shouldn't have been so out front. tonight though, i'll point out desiree rogers spoke to my colleague, suzanne malveaux and the speculation out there maybe she had fallen out of favor with valley jaruerie jarrett and othe within the white house because of these incidents was nonsense. she feels she set up the white house social secretary office, put on hundreds of events. it's a very tough job in terms of the volume of people coming through. you're not going to do it perfectly every time. she feels she did the job well and is moving on now.
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>> ed henry, interesting obviously. we're going to keep on top of this. we're going to dig deeper now, laura schwartz, former assistant to president clinton. she's joining us from chicago. good evening, laura. >> hey, sanjay. >> how are you doing? you were in a role like this. i was curious -- i wanted to have you on the show to talk simply about your first impressions. do you think desiree's resignati resignation, was that something that surprised you? >> i was expecting it any time now. it's been 14 months since they came into office. there's been a little while since november when the india state dinner was. i really think -- i mean, this is just me talking here -- i really think here after the event happened she then got relegated to the gates wearing her i.d. badge, checking people in. like she should, but, again, back to what ed was saying about those glossy magazines and fashion week in new york and things. i don't think that was the job anymore she really wanted it to be. >> i mean, at the end of the day
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do you think that she was asked to leave, essentially? she resigned. was she asked to leave? do you really think it was because her job became more menial than she would have liked? >> she came into that job as one of the best friends of the obamas. think it's really difficult to separate friendship, like you would hear her on "entertainment tonight" and "extra" referring to michelle would like this and barack would like that. they are the president and first lady. i don't think she really had that separation between friend and staffer. i think it was a really big hit for her personally. i have to tell you, sanjay, if they had handled this better i don't think it would be a fireable offense to say, we screwed up, this is never going to happen again, we've re-evaluated the issues in the social office and we're moving forward. instead when this happened they sort of threw the secret service under the bus for a while. that makes it a lot harder to recover from. >> were you surprised, ed henry talked about the fact president obama, himself, essentially gave a dressing down to desiree rogers. were you surprised by that?
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did something like that happen to you when you worked for the clintons? >> no, luckily not. i don't think it was not warranted. i mean, when you think about it, here we had the first state dinner of this administration. india. they talked about great issues about the economy and world backdrop between india and the united states. there were a lot of great issues that day. what were we talking about? gate crashers. how happy do you think the country of india was with that? it deserved a dressing down and should never happen again. >> it's a very disciplined white house. president obama likes to speak of teachable moments, as you know. was there one here? >> i think there was. own up to the mistake and move forward. the claiming of executive privilege, the reason she can't go and testify or answer questions is not the moment to use the executive privilege card. i think they learned a lot from this as desiree did and we'll see what's next. >> all right. laura schwartz, thanks so much.
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stay warm in chicago, by the way. >> oh, it's great. >> all right. up next, it is snowing, have you heard? easy for me to say from the balmy south here. it is bad. we know that. we'll show you how bad, where and why it isn't over yet. later, what happened to just moments after seaworld visitor captured this video? did the killer whale's trainer make a fatal mistake? what should happen to that whale? jack hanna is going to join us.
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coming up, new details in the killer whale attack that left a seaworld trainer dead. is it possible the victim made a fatal mistake that led to the attack? first, though, other important stories we're following along. brianna keeler joins us.
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with the "360 bulletin." snow it continues to pound the northeast tonight. in the third major storm of the month. it's dumped more than 2 feet of snow in some areas. forcing the cancelation of roughly a thousand flights in new york airports, alone. also in new york, governor david paterson today announced he will not run for a full term in office. the governor dropped his campaign after reports that state police interfered in a top aide's domestic violence dispute. paterson asked new york attorney general andrew cuomo to investigate. meantime, he spoke to the press today denying any wrongdoing. >> i have never abused my office, not now, not ever. and i believe that when the facts are reviewed the truth will prevail. word today that president obama called former vice president dick cheney to wish him a speedy recovery. the white house said the president called mr. cheney wednesday after his release from the hospital. the former vp suffered a mild heart attack monday, fifth in 32
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years. a hong kong jeweler smashed world records today paying a whopping $35.3 million for a rough diamond. at 507 karats the diamond is one of the 20 biggest high-quality gems in the world, sanjay. >> i wonder if my wife's watching right now. >> hopefully not. >> you just got married. maybe your husband's watching. >> right. i'm going to go home and, hello, hello. >> we have nothing to say about that. stick with us here. i have our beat 360 winners. daily challenge to viewers. a chance to show up staffers by coming up with a better caption for the photo we post on our blog every day. tonight's photo, three men walk their dogs in central park in the middle of today's snowstorm. lucky dogs. our staff winner is tracy, her caption, with all respect to frank zappa, "watch out where the doggies go and don't you eat that yellow snow."
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not bad. not bad. our viewer winner is kevin from atlanta. his caption is, "woof blizzard here, reporting live. snow slowly turning yellow one puddle at a time." >> that's very clever. i really like that one. i have to say i think kevin's wins out overall. very cute. i'm sure wolf will be pleased. >> let's send him a t-shirt for sure. all right. serious stuff when we come back. jack hanna joins us to talk about what this killer whale did to a trainer and what the trainer might have done that sealed her fate. later, a mother who simply would not give up until she found her son. we were there for that reunion. you get to see it for yourself when "360" continues. can be more confident in their ability to be ready with cialis. with two clinically proven dosing options, you can choose the moment that's right for you and your partner. 36-hour cialis and cialis for daily use. cialis for daily use is a low-dose tablet you take every day, so you can be ready anytime the moment's right. day or night. >> tell your doctor about your medical condition
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new developments today out of seaworld in orlando where a 12,000 pound killer whale named tilikum fatally attacked a trainer. officials there said shows featuring the whales are going to resume tomorrow. the head of seaworld praised tilikum, calling him a wonderful
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animal that won't be punished. one former trainer speaking out saying the victim made a deadly error in judgment. up close tonight, here's randi kaye. >> reporter: you're looking at video of seaworld trainer dawn brandcheau. a tourist taped this. it was just moments before the 12,000 pound killer whale, called tilikum, took the veteran trainer into his mouth and dove under water. brandcheau sways from side to side. he follows. she splashes him with buckets of water and feeds him fish. a reward for playing along. then suddenly his behavior seemed to change. the wife of the tourist who took this video described what happened on nbc. >> he grabbed her by the head and, you know, very hard thrusts. she went down. i screamed and she screamed. i started yelling to the other trainer because he wasn't looking. i said, he took her down. he took her down. >> reporter: earlier reports suggested the whale had grabbed brandcheau's waist. today seaworld set the record straight. >> our best analysis at this
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point is he grabbed her ponytail. >> reporter: look closely at this video. you can see brandcheau's long ponytail swinging back and forth. it may not have looked attractive to this six-ton killer whale until she got closer. the man who trained her said she made a fatal mistake. >> i think she made a mistake by putting her, and allowing herself, to be that close to his mouth and laying down. that's a pretty vulnerable position to be in with an animal like him. so i think -- i think even if dawn was sitting here with me right now, she would tell you that was a mistake she made. >> reporter: remember, tilikum had killed before. in 1991 he and two other whales pulled a trainer who fell into the pool underwater in a park in british columbia. that's why seaworld was more cautious with him. trainers were not allowed to swim with tilikum. >> he's not used to people being in the water. he was laying there looking at her. she was rubbing him down.
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all of a sudden the ponytail was there. >> reporter: on this video you can see what he's talking about. brandcheau is on a shelf that slides out into the pool. laying in about four inches of water. right next to the 22-foot-long orca. >> the ponytail drifted there. he probably grabbed it and pulled her in and went, whoa, i have her in the water. >> reporter: licinik who has worked with whales for three decades says he's convinced at least in the beginning tilikum had no idea he was doing anything wrong or hurting his trainer. he says brandcheau understandably panicked and that trauma only got the killer whale even more excited. the medical examiner says dawn brandcheau likely died from multiple traumatic injuries and drowning. >> i constantly remind trainers never get comfortable, totally comfortable with the animals. >> reporter: he says there's a reason these whales are called killer whales. and what they may think is a game can be fatal.
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randi kaye, cnn, washington. seaworld's decision to basically defend tilikum is drawing plenty of fire then there is the bigger picture. debate over whether enormous predators should be kept in tanks performing for audiences in the first place. plenty to talk about. with me now, jack hanna, director amartis of the columbus zoo who supports keeping whales in the captivity. has a long-standing relationship with seaworld, on its conservation board as well. russ rector, founder of dolphin freedom foundation. he believes whales belong in the ocean. let's get right to it. jack, details coming in now are terrifying. source at seaworld telling us tilikum dove deep under water after seizing the ponytail and took staffers 40 minutes to retrieve her body. what does that mean to you? does that tell you any more about what happened? >> if you look at the first interview i did two hours after the incident on wednesday, you'll see i said in not knowing the details that maybe human error was involved. not knowing anything, just 42
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years of working with animals. this wasn't an attack by any means. the whale saw the hair, something different, took the hair and took dawn, who was a very good friend -- i'm still not over that -- down and obviously what happened happened. as far as the whales at seaworld, they're socially, mentally, physically, beautifully cared for or they wouldn't be breeding, or wouldn't be eating and certainly wouldn't be living there. obviously i support it for many, many reasons. it's not just education. it's the fact that 80% plus killer whales at seaworld are born at seaworld. this speaks very highly of their breeding programs. >> russ, i want you to look at some of the video i think we have as well. you used to train dolphins. orcas are a type of dolphin. many of us have seen video of the orcas in the wild throwing and playing with their prey. is this what you think -- you can see the video right there i think, russ. is this what you think was happening here or do you think something else? do you think he just snapped? >> no, this was an attack.
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this animal killed twice before. he knows how to kill. he attacked, he killed her. he took her down to the windows underwater and showed her body to the people below eating dinner. it took 40 minutes to get her away from him. they had to take him over to the med pool which has a false bottom, lift him out of the water and pry her out of his mouth. because she was a trophy. that's why. that was an attack. happy animals -- happy animals don't kill trainers. >> it is hard to talk about what has happened here in that context certainly. jack, what about what russ is saying? let me ask you the question this way. can all animals be put into captivity? tilikum had been involved at least in three killings before. was he possibly not right, tilikum -- >> well, again, i don't know what russ -- i know what russ' background is, by the way. the questions of attack, have you ever seen a killer whale attack, sanjay? while we've been in the wild, when a killer whale attacks, especially go up on the land 10 or 15 feet to get a big old 400
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pound sea lion, it's like a bomb going off. that's an attack. if this was an attack he wouldn't be grabbing her hair, taking her down. i don't get into detail like he wants to get into detail. the woman who's a friend is gone, all right? that's not an attack whatsoever by a killer whale. he should know that. if he knows a lot about whales. studied them in the wild or at least been with them in the wild like i have, that wasn't an attack whatsoever. >> russ, i think it's appropriate to not get into some of these details, but go ahead, what were you going to say to jack? >> i was going to say, first of all there are no documented attacks on people by orcas in the wild. only in captivity. yes, i've seen them attack how they hunt. blaming dawn for this, jack, is like blaming a rape victim for being raped. >> did i say i blamed dawn? seaworld hasn't come out yet with a statement. i said from the very start if you work with animals for 42
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years like i have -- if you look with animals for 42 years like i have, i'm just saying a lot of accidents happen in our business. including with me, my good friend steve irwin, a lot of time it's human error. i don't know what the protocol is at seaworld. all i know is what i saw. >> let me put it to you this way. was there a mistake made in any way here? if so, what is to be learned? what is to be learned? what is to be changed in the future? >> obviously what's learned, mistake is the long hair, if anything, i guess, what from i saw from the video i studied this afternoon. obviously seaworld will make those changes. after 2-million plus interactions with whales for years, this is the first incident and death they've had. much more good has come out of it. if dawn were alive today she'd want her work to continue and seaworld's work to continue. e i know that for a fact. 22 million people at seaworld would say that and 180 million people that went to our zoos and aquariums would say that. >> there are a lot of people who never make it into the wild, never get a chance to see the animals there. this may be their only opportunity.
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of course, she did have long hair for some time. it's tough to look at video still of her in the moments before all this happened. >> real quickly, she had that long hair. she was growing that hair, she going to cut several weeks for cancer. she was growing that hair for kids with cancer. can you imagine that? how her parents, i feel and other people feel is beyond comprehension. that's why i'm sure seaworld will come out with a lot of this stuff. right now they're trying to let the family and us recover then we can tell everybody every detail of what happened. >> we know that -- >> jack, let me ask you a question. >> okay, russ, real quick. we'll let jack take this. go ahead. >> jack, how many kills does this animal get? he's killed three people. does he get four, five, six? >> you know something, russ, i can't argue that. i know what the incident was up north. second kill, as you know, the man, you've been in the business, jumped over the fence, went in there at nighttime, dove down because he wanted to be with the killer whale, obviously was tilly. the point is, as you well know,
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it kanlt be seaworld's fault or the whale's fault. the first one i don't know about, russ. this one we all know about. with that said i can't see putting the whale back out in the wild. you know this as well as i do. the animal would not even live two or three days -- >> he is not going to go back to the wild. >> exactly right. >> he shouldn't go back to the wild. >> right. >> to be clear, seaworld has issued a statement saying the animal will not go back to the wild. will stay at seaworld. >> i know that. >> okay. just clarification for our audience, first two events, one as you mentioned and the second one, i think there were actually three whales involved. i'm not sure we're going to get absolute clarification or conclusion here. obviously lots to think about. jack hanna, russ rector, many thanks to you both. >> thank you. join the live chat happening at ac360.com. send your questions and comments as well to twitter at sanjay gupta cnn. still ahead, the power of a mother's love. what it took to find her small son after the earthquake in haiti. and what that amazing reunion must have been like. plus an athlete, a really good athlete and a scholar.
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a rogue scholar. myron rolle has a shot of being near the top of the nfl draft after spending the last year at oxford university. he's an amazing guy. we have his amazing journey. they rate its fit and finish and the amenities inside. they factor in purchase price and operating costs. fuel economy and resale value. in short, they do what you do to test its quality. now get a low mileage lease on this 2010 malibu for around $199 a month for 39 months. call for details. see your local chevy dealer.
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let's go to haiti tonight. to find an incredible story of hope, strength and determination, about a mother and her child. they were separated by the
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earthquake. in the weeks after mother searched for son. she never stopped looking, never gave up. this week the two are reunited and gary tuchman was there. >> reporter: eclane survived the earthquake, but she's been looking for her 2-year-old son for weeks. >> translator: he's a very kind boy. even if we don't have enough to eat we do it together. we stick together. >> reporter: eclane's home was destroyed. rubble has already been cleared. both her legs were injured. her son, kervins, though, was more seriously hurt. taken away by military helicopter for treatment. problem is no one took the toddler's name when they flew him away. kervins disappeared. more than a week, eclane hobbled on her crutches down the street of port-au-prince, took taxis desperately looking for her son, going to different hospitals and having no luck whatsoever until she got here. this is the entrance to the country's largest aids clinic.
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it so happens this is where her son was brought. and where he was for only a while. eclane met dr. vanessa here. though the doctor never knew the boy's name, she remembered him. >> i met him on the 23rd after he'd had his leg amputated because he has a severe leg injury that was infected. he hadn't had care for over a week. >> reporter: it broke the doctor's heart when she had to tell eclane her boy had been moved a week earlier. he'd been flown to the u.s.s. comfort for treatment. >> the red tape starts, basically. >> reporter: she flew to the u.s. ship looking for kervins. once again he was gone. he had been transferred to a hospital in northern haiti, six hours away from his mom. at least they'd be together again, right? wrong. the red tape. the earthquake destroyed eclane's personal paper. had no legal proof kervins was her son.
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>> started to panic. they want to do things the right way. how can we prove these people claiming to be parents are really parents? >> reporter: finally after almost three weeks in that hospital they were reunited. the international red cross and the government of haiti had concluded eclane and kervins were, indeed, mother and son. this was the moment his mother had been dreaming about. it had been five weeks since she'd seen her 2-year-old. the international red cross says the delay was necessary. you don't think that it was wrong it took so long? >> on the contrary i think it was right all the procedures were followed and that now there is a happy ending. >> reporter: how do you feel right now having your son back? >> translator: i'm ecstatic. i'm so happy i don't know what to say. >> reporter: then it was time to go home. they returned to a tiny tent in the middle of one of the poorest slums in port-au-prince. the conditions for everyone here are anything but good.
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but at least kervins is with his mom. >> she just took her face and rubbed it against the little boy's cheek. 2-year-old boy is so cute. tough to see him back in that tent, i'm sure, gary for you and a lot of people. what is his prognosis? >> reporter: the prognosis is very good. kervins' in excellent care in the two hospitals in the u.s.s. comfort. you saw that little tent. the tent where they're living is the size of a toy for a lot of children. toy tent. the sanitation is abysmal. their bathroom is a porta-potty. their shower is buckets over their head. that wonderful doctor, a pediatrician and pledges she will take good care of little kervins. >> that's good to hear for sure. i've been down there and saw the same sort of things, gary, you did. you do stories like this, but keeping in mind there are probably others like them. are there other injured children separated from their parents that you know of? >> reporter: the international committee of the red cross says they have dozens of children right now separated from their parents. children are too young to talk
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so they can't say who their parents are. they think a lot of those children may have parents alive somewhere in this country and trying to match them up. >> gary, be safe down there. we'll hope to see you again soon. there's much more on this story at ac360.com where our producer has written a compelling behind the scenes account of what you just witnessed. new chapter next in one of the most inspiring stories we've ever shown. he traded a bright nfl future for oxford university. this rogue scholar is ready to play, but as you see, he has much bigger dreams than that. also tiger's latest setback. which brand is dumping him now? the answer when "360" continues. get inside each. and see what you find. if perfection is what you pursue, this just might change your course. meet the new class of world class. the twenty-ten lacrosse, from buick.
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the scouting combine is under way as football fans know, a chance for pro scouts to check out physical skills of top
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college football athletes before the nfl draft. one of this year's standouts is attempting something that's never been done before. myron rolle hopes to be picked near the top of the nfl draft. despite skipping a year of football to study as a rogue scholar at oxford university. he plans eventually to become a surgeon. rolle's journey launched our series, inspirational stories about people whose lives often go unnoticed. here's soledad o'brien. >> reporter: myron rolle was on a fast track to having it all. a gifted athlete, he was all but assured enormous fame and even bigger money. then something happened. you quit basically. >> i did. i did. i don't like saying that word. >> reporter: from the moment he first touched a football myron rolle was a star. >> i was good at it. i was bigger than other kids so i had some success. >> reporter: in high school espn ranked myron the number one senior football player in the country. 83 colleges made him an offer.
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>> myron rolle! >> reporter: myron chose florida state university, a prime launching pad for the pros. myron played safety. his future, a shoo-in first-round pick in the nfl draft last year. millions of dollars to follow. but that's when he basically quit when he put it all at risk. why did you leave, why did you quit football? >> i left football because the rogue scholarship was too great to pass up. it was either now or never. >> reporter: he won a prestigious scholarship, the in med cal anthropology at oxford university in england. myron moved to england and watched the nfl draft from the sidelines. >> it hurt. it really did. inside deep i said, i could be out there right now making millions of dollars. that could be my name being called. when i went to oxford, i said, this is the right choice.
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>> reporter: he's not done with his studies. as he has more to do at oxford. now nearly a year later, with that certainty of his, myron rolle came back. >> how are you doing? >> welcome home. >> thank you. thank you. >> reporter: sports superagent lee steinberg represents myron. >> we have to expose him to the teams in a way that will make them fall in love with him. we want him as top of the first round draft pick. >> reporter: first round. the difference between first round and say, third, millions. myron rolle has big dreams for using those millions. after a few years in the pros he wants to go to med school to become a neurosurgeon. >> nice. good. >> he's got to get back to england to finish his degree, but today, he's in orlando. >> push now, push, push, push. >> reporter: renowned trainer, tom shaw, pushing him hard. >> pop it. you can't make mistakes in the first round draft choice. that's how general managers get fired. you have to make sure this kid is everything that you expect
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him to be. >> reporter: make no mistake. here, no one cares about oxford. this is business. high-stakes football. is this guy as good as he was a year ago? for all of his journey, myron's had family helping clear the way. >> i remember something when we were younger i told myron i was like, yeah, i always got your back. >> 88 pounds. >> reporter: his older brother, mckinley, followed him to florida state and then on to oxford. and now game on. myron played well in the senior bowl last month. the nfl draft is weeks away. it's pressure. >> sometimes it's overwhelming. sometime you have to take a step back. >> reporter: lots of people have stopped using. you are a future of black america. is that a compliment or is it terrifying? >> you know, it's a compliment, but it's definitely more pressure, like, hey, we're counting on you. >> reporter: so many people counting on him.
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>> you know what rs" stands for? >> what's that? >> rogue scholar. >> reporter: for "in america," soledad o'brien, cnn, orlando. >> very few athletes have the drive or grades or guts to do what myron rolle is doing. we've been highlighting achievements own contributions of leaders like myron rolle as black history month. reflect our past triumphs to look to the future with men and women who are making their own history. so myron, good into the nfl and i hope one day they will welcome you into into the world of neurosurgery as well. good luck to you. bombshell now in the tiger woods' story. tell you about that next. how the canadian women celebrated their hockey win. we'll give you a clue. bottoms up. and the price they're paying for it now. this, my friends, is what i am bringing to the table. hunt's flashsteams every tomato to keep that backyard garden fresh taste. isn't it time to take a fresh look at your tomatoes? so i couldn't always do what i wanted to do. but five minutes ago, i took symbicort, and symbicort is already helping significantly improve my lung function.
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just ahead a record amount of snow as now fallen in new
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york's central park. we sent the "ac 360" crew to investigate. in fact, it's the "shot" tonight. let's get caught up on important stories. brianna keilar with the 360 news and business bulletin. sanjay, tiger woods loses another endorsement deal. he'll no longer be doing commercials like this one for pepsico's gatorade. the company has cut ties with the golfer. it's third major sponsor to drop him. kidnapping victim jaycee dugard taken the first step toward filing a lawsuit against the state of california. you'll recall she was kidnapped as a child by convicted sex offender phillip garrido, who held her prisoner 18 years. his parole agents failed to spot dugard living in his backyard. dugard filed a claim to preserve her right to sue. hockey canada apologized today for its women's hockey team's on-ice celebration of its gold medal. they partied with beer, champagne, even cigars.
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fans had left the arena. international olympic committee is looking into the incident, sanjay. >> the cigars, huh? quite a sight. i imagine the fans would have stuck around just to see that. >> well, apparently the problem is there was media there, right? always the problem. >> media always is the problem. ioc, we'll see what they have to say about this. brianna, stick around for tonight's "shot." an "ac 360" snow day if you will. more than 35 inches of the white stuff fell in new york in february, as you know. it also gave us an excuse to send the crew out to central park for their own special weather report. brianna, take a look at this. ♪ >> it's pushing these arms of snow almost hurricane-like arms. >> hey, chad myers in atlanta. this is frank romano in new york. >> snow continues. it continues for laguardia. i love showing you this map. >> you have all of these great magic walls and monitors.
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>> i have to draw it for you. here so that you can kind of see. >> i would understand if this was august, but it's winter in new york. we got snow. oh. ♪ >> somebody want to give me a hand here? ♪ >> just salting here. salting. please be careful. everyone, please be careful. ♪ ♪ >> well, that's the end of our "360" weather report. we have some unfinished business. let's get to it. good night. >> very nice, guys. very nice. >> that last shot. >> i think that was the most fun they've had in a while. >> i think so. you've got to love a snow day in news. they are few, far and between.

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